STS Futures: A Symposium

image of the STS Futures Symposium logo

-- Thank you for the overwhelming interest in our event. Registration is now closed. --

The graduate program in Science & Technology Studies at York University is pleased to host the inaugural STS Futures symposium on February 7, 2020.

We invite scholars to reflect on the changing landscapes of STS, to consider the futures of STS as discipline, practice, field or assemblage, and to discuss the future of graduate training in STS. STS as a field has increasing social and political relevance for the world as we see dramatic shifts in the climate, speculative claims about computer-human interfaces, disturbing trends in security practices, increasing public mistrust of evidence and its relationship to policy, private forays into space exploration, and new revolutionary technologies across a range of fields. There will be three roundtable discussions to uncover this landscape: Knowledge Infrastructures; Activisms; Democracies and Publics.

The purpose of this event is to discuss the futures of science and technology studies generally and globally in order to reimagine the graduate program in STS at York University.

The event will begin with a keynote by esteemed scholar Dr. Sheila Jasanoff, followed by the roundtables with STS scholars and graduate students from the EU, UK, US and Canada to consider the multiple futures of STS, including the importance of graduate training in the future of STS as a field/discipline, and to imagine new innovative models for critical pedagogy in STS.

When: Friday, February 7, 2020
When: 9:00am–5:30pm
Where: 140 HNES, Keele Campus, York University

Thank you for the overwhelming interest in our event. Registration is now closed.

Panels

Knowledge Infrastructures:

We imagine “knowledge infrastructures” to be a broad container, gesturing to often unseen ordering practices and relations that simultaneously enable and constrain, enacting some worlds and not others. Possible foci include: language, data, categories, institutions, social rules and etiquette, hardware and software, maps, laws, policies, networks, methodologies, disciplines, diagnoses, assessments (and likely other configurations that intersect with your research and expertise). 

Publics and Democracies:

We imagine "Publics and Democracies" to be an intentionally capacious theme. STS researchers have long engaged with participatory and interventionist forms of scholarship. We would like speakers to address the meanings, forms, and functions of "publics and democracies" in STS in the context of the history of the field, its current status, and its future relevance. Possible questions to spark discussion might include:

  • What is the state or position of STS in a “post-truth” world?
  • How do the sciences help assemble different publics?
  • How do publics engage with science and technology?
  • To what extent is the public sphere itself a technoscientific assemblage?

Activisms:

We imagine "Activisms" to be an intentionally capacious theme. STS researchers have long engaged with participatory and interventionist forms of scholarship. We would like speakers to address the meanings, forms, and functions of "activisms" in STS in the context of the history of the field, its current status, and its future relevance. Possible questions to spark discussion might include:

  • Is activism a role, an ethos, a method, a kind of intervention, a category of analysis, or something else?
  • What are the varieties and forms of activisms in STS and how are they positioned in the context of the discipline?
  • Who constitutes a "public," "citizen," "community," "activist"?

Participants

Plus York faculty and graduate students

Drew Belsky
Conor Douglas
Katelyn Ma
Eric Kennedy
Aryn Martin
Hélène Mialet
Natasha Myers
Sarah Qidwai (Toronto PhD student)
Alex Rutherford
Chandni Vadhavana